This Month in Music History- August 1, 1964: With Beatles ‘A Hard Day’s Night’ Album #1,Title Song Goes Top

If you weren’t a Beatles fan in 1964, then you maybe wanted to be an ostrich. There wasn’t any way you were going to get away from them. So, find a hole and stick your head in it  In the midst of one of the most creative golden periods of any artists ever, the group of lads from Liverpool, John, Paul, George, and Ringo, were riding high. On this month, specifically, August 1st, 1964, their third studio album, A Hard Day’s Night,  sat at the number one spot on the Billboard Charts.  The first day of August would find The Beatles’ first single, ‘A Hard  Day’s Night’ also reach the chart’s number one spot for singles.

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The price of going full bore after fame began to get to the Beatles. Their previous album The Beatles For Sale was the general sentiment of the group at the time. They loved the music but were becoming more disillusioned by the trappings of the industry. The album, for the most part documented their grumpiness.

The next year things would change. All of the boys were huge fans of Hollywood films. When the opportunity came to make a film, they would all jump at the chance. Of course, there would be an album as well.

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A Hard Day’s Night would find the Beatles taking a major step forward as musicians.  The album represents a stronger core to their song writing, both Lennon/McCartney and George Harrison. They would caste aside the bubblegum aspects that laced their early songs. The melodies became lusher and denser. The harmonies became more intricate and  engaging. The album remained strong from the start to the end. All credit due to their producer George Martin.

Martin, well versed in the art of song arraigning, Martin was able to help the boys to bring to life their increasingly avant-garde song ideas. His classical music training and production of classical records for his Parlophone label served as a great contrast to the Beatles pop music sensibilities.

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